NEW MOVIE "DEAR WHITE PEOPLE" RAISES QUESTIONS ABOUT RACIAL IDENTITY IN POST-RACIAL AMERICA

VIA SUNDANCE.ORG

VIA SUNDANCE.ORG

Let's take it back to the film "School Daze", or how about the cult classic "Do the Right Thing" ? The days where majority of African-American directed films raised questions through social commentary with a heavy dose of satire.

Where did those films go?

Up-and-coming writer/director Justin Simien may be the answer to our inquisitions with this year's indie hit "Dear White People". The satirical film DWP takes a look at the black perspective and experience as a student on a predominately white university campus. The context of the film is centered around a riot that breaks out after there is an "African- American themed party" thrown on campus by white students (these are real, we have seen photos on Facebook). Simien, who attended a predominantly white university, shares a personal connection to the film.

I wanted to comment on my black experience —being a black face navigating between white spaces and black space, not really sure how I fit into either.
— http://www.latimes.com/

Armed with a young and fresh cast, DWP reminds us of the classic Spike-Lee films that expressed African-American culture and how it fit and sometimes did not fit into society, BUT DO NOT BE HASTY TO LABEL SIMIEN AS SPIKE LEE JR. DWP and Simien come from the Obama generation of young adults who live in a society where everyone loves Oprah and Beyonce but words of bigotry and underline racism can still be heard on the streets. We no longer all attend HBCU's for a first class education nor label ourselves as heterosexual; there is a new worldview for the Black perspective and Simien is paving that original road. DWP received so much independent buzz this past year that it became the talk of the 2014 Sundance Festival gaining critic and fan support. It will hit theaters October 17th, and we will definitely be first in line for a ticket! 

Check out the trailer for the film below. 

What do you think of the trailer? Can you relate to the content?

Written by Amber Patterson and Edited by Dariana Colon-Bibb